WHEN I have fears that I may cease to be
  Before my pen has glean’d my teeming brain,
Before high piled books, in charact’ry,
  Hold like rich garners the full-ripen’d grain;
When I behold, upon the night’s starr’d face,         5
  Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance,
And think that I may never live to trace
  Their shadows, with the magic hand of chance;
And when I feel, fair creature of an hour!
  That I shall never look upon thee more,         10
Never have relish in the faery power
  Of unreflecting love!—then on the shore
Of the wide world I stand alone, and think
Till Love and Fame to nothingness do sink.

By: John Keats

this poem reminded me a lot about the question which you have always asked yourself at least once in your lifetime. What if i die tomorrow? How will i be remembered? Keats expresses his fear of this in the first line, “When I have fears that I may cease to be, before my pen has glean’d my teeming brain” his fear is what if he dies before he is unable to get his thoughts (which will be expressed through his pen, his writing) out? There is also a theme in this poem which you see that love and fame live on, even though he will not be there “That I shall never look upon thee more (…) of the wide world I stand alone, and think till love and fame do nothingness do sink.” This also makes a strong connection to the story of Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh learns that he can not defeat death, but that love will love on.  

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